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  • Writer's picturePaul Condello

Gruff

Sometimes a person needs to act tough to help someone.


A valuable insight for both Christians and non-Christians for life in the public is to recognize these scenarios.

Imagine a high school student steps off his skateboard on the way to school after seeing two students pushing around a classmate whose father is a principal. Picking up his skateboard, he tells them to knock it off firmly but cooly as he walks over. In his own way, he tells them not to take out their anger at their classmate's father on his son, but they ignore the explanation. They don't start to listen until he tells them to knock it off again more loudly. They finally stop after his voice becomes a little gruff. A few classmates watching who didn't try to help then whisper to each other that he didn't have to get all upset about it.


That scenario represents many situations where people, children or adults, turn on a figure acting authoritatively who finds they have to act a little sternly. Ideally, it is helpful to find ways to stop situations through dialogues and other means, but some urgent situations don't allow for it when the people involved won't listen to calm persuasion. Unfortunately, some bystanders hear shouting or the roughness in someone's voice without equating it with its real purpose in these situations.


A valuable insight for both Christians and non-Christians for life in the public is to recognize these scenarios. There are times when someone may feel compelled to use a tough tone to help someone in need. When applicable, Christians and non-Christians want to help support that person as appropriate to deescalate the situation before it becomes more serious. There is a distinctive difference between using a tough tone just to be controlling and using a tough tone to help someone when other options aren't working or known in the moment.


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